News

The OpposePPL.com website is now live.  "The purpose of this site is to provide energy users with 'plain english' information about PPL's proposed rate increase."

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From Cleveland.com:

FirstEnergy Corp. said Monday it has purchased a replacement lid for the Davis-Besse reactor near Toledo and wants to install it in 2011.

Davis-Besse has been shut down since Feb. 28 for extensive work to repair cracks in the lid that sprouted unexpectedly in critical components. Such cracks can allow radioactive coolant into the reactor's containment building -- or worse. Federal rules require an immediate shutdown if leaks are detected.

The cracks are similar to fissures that opened up in the late 1990s in parts of Davis-Besse's original lid and led to a pineapple-sized corrosion hole in that lid before it was discovered in 2002.

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On Friday, February 26, 2010 PPL increased its dividend to shareholders then the following Monday March 1, 2010 PPL issued a media release titled "PPL Electric Utilities to request modest distribution rate increases for 2011." To conclude the statement of reasons for the increase PPL stated, "PPL Electric's proposed distribution rate increase is just and reasonable and should be approved by the Commission."

 

PPL states it is modest, just, and reasonable to:

  • Increase its rates $114,676,490 annually
  • Increase residential customer service charges 82%
  • Increase PPL's portion of the average residential bill 27%
  • Require residential customers to pay 100% of the increase
  • Request a rate increase every few years
  • Implement a rate structure that provides the greatest increase to smallest users

PPL believes that its proposed rate increase is modest, just, and reasonable; do you? The Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission has ordered an investigation into the lawfulness, justness, and reasonableness of PPL's rates, rules, and regulations. Sustainable Energy Fund encourages all consumers affected by the proposed rate increase to come to the hearings.

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

6PM

Harrisburg

Commonwealth Keystone Building
2nd Floor Hearing Room,
400 North St.
Harrisburg, PA 17120

"We have concluded that the best policy for electric distribution companies, such as PPL Electric Utilities, is to charge a flat monthly fee for electricity delivery services, rather than fees based on the kilowatt-hours used" said John Sipics, PPL's former President, concerning PPL's 2005 rate increase.

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In response to feedback and requests from stakeholders, the NRC and FEMA will be holding an additional public meeting on the proposed changes to NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Supplement 3.

The meeting will be held on Wednesday, July 21, 2010 in Tampa, FL from 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm EDT.  Teleconferencing and web conferencing will be available for those individuals who wish to participate remotely.  To participate remotely, interested individuals should contact Sara Mroz or Annette Stang via email at Emergencypreparedness.resource@nrc.gov by July 15, 2010.

The meeting notice and details can be found online at:

http://adamswebsearch2.nrc.gov/idmws/doccontent.dll?library=PU_ADAMS^PBNTAD01&ID=101720248
 

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The following power uprates are currently under review by the NRC.  The licensees for the following plants have not been authorized by the NRC to operate the plants at power levels that reflect the following increases.

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The Environmental Protection Agency
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is hosting four public information meetings on the proposed study of the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and its potential impacts on drinking water. Hydraulic fracturing is a process that helps production of natural gas or oil from shale and other geological formations. By pumping fracturing fluids (water and chemical additives) and sand or other similar materials into rock formations, fractures are created that allow natural gas or oil to flow from the rock through the fractures to a production well for extraction. The meetings will provide public information about the proposed study scope and design. EPA will solicit public comments on the draft study plan.

The public meetings will be held on:

  • July 8 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. CDT at the Hilton Fort Worth in Fort Worth, Texas
  • July 13 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. MDT at the Marriot Tech Center’s Rocky Mountain Events Center in Denver, Colo.
  • July 22 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. EDT at the Hilton Garden Inn in Canonsburg, Pa.
  • August 12 at the Anderson Performing Arts Center at Binghamton University in Binghamton, N.Y. for 3 sessions - 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. EDT

Natural gas plays a key role in our nation’s clean energy future and hydraulic fracturing is one way of accessing this vital resource. However, serious concerns have been raised about hydraulic fracturing’s potential impact on drinking water, human health and the environment. To address these concerns, EPA announced in March that it will study the potential adverse impact that hydraulic fracturing may have on drinking water.

To support the initial planning phase and guide the development of the study plan, the agency sought suggestions and comments from the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB)—an independent, external federal advisory committee. The agency will use this advice and extensive stakeholder input to guide the design of the study.

Stakeholders are requested to pre-register for the meetings at least 72 hours before each meeting.

More information on the meetings:

http://www.epa.gov/safewater/uic/wells_hydrofrac.html

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From the Brattleboro Reformer:

The NRC is meeting its mission of protecting public health, safety, and the environment ..." stated the Groundwater Task Force.A report issued by a Nuclear Regulatory Commission task force concluded the NRC has responded appropriately to the radioactive contamination of groundwater and soil at the nation's nuclear power plants.

The task force was made up of a number of NRC staffers, which issued its report on June 11.

It conducted several months of evaluations of the agency's past, current and planned actions regarding radioactive contamination of groundwater and soil.

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Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1: Environmental Assessment Regarding the Request for Exemption From Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 50, Appendix R Requirements (TAC No. ME0771)

Download ML100880077

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SUSQUEHANNA STEAM ELECTRIC STATION, UNIT NO.2 - REQUEST FOR ALTERNATIVE NO. RR-07 MAIN STEAM SAFETY RELIEF VALVE TEST INTERVAL EXTENSION (TAC NO. ME3320)

Download ML101520431

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COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA

Dept. of Environmental Protection

Commonwealth News Bureau
Room 308, Main Capitol Building
Harrisburg PA., 17120

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

IRRC Also Votes to Enhance Erosion and Sediment Control, Stormwater Regulations

HARRISBURG -- Governor Edward G. Rendell today praised two votes by members of the Independent Regulatory Review Commission that he said will protect Pennsylvania’s streams and drinking water supplies against total dissolved solids pollution from Marcellus Shade drilling wells and other sources from stormwater runoff.

The new total dissolved solids, or TDS, rules the commission approved today will ensure that rivers and streams in Pennsylvania do not exceed the safe drinking water standard of 500 milligrams per liter, the Governor said. The rules also will protect businesses by grandfathering all existing discharges and allowing businesses to use a stream’s ability to absorb those discharges while not exceeding drinking water standards.

“Today’s IRRC vote is a great step forward in our efforts to protect one of the state’s greatest natural and economic assets—our waterways,” said Governor Rendell. “Millions of Pennsylvanians rely on the state’s rivers and streams for drinking water; countless numbers of our residents and visitors from out-of-state come here to fish these waters or use them for recreation; and some of our largest industrial employers wouldn’t be able to operate here if not for the clean, reliable supply of water they offer. So, we cannot allow new, heavily polluted sources of wastewater to contaminate them.

“That’s why these regulations are so important,” added the Governor, who noted the approved regulations now await review from the environmental resources and energy committees in the state house and senate.

“As the natural gas industry expands to access the Marcellus Shale reserves in Pennsylvania, the volume of wastewater returned to our streams could increase exponentially, and the only way to protect our water resources is to implement new wastewater treatment standards for the drilling industry,” said Department of Environmental Protection Secretary John Hanger. “The National Association of Water Companies and many other individuals and groups across the state strongly support the adoption of this rule and I commend the Independent Regulatory Review Commission for taking this action. All other industries are responsible for the waste they generate and the drilling industry should be no exception.”

Hanger noted that drilling wastewater contains very high levels of total dissolved solids – chlorides and sulfides – that must be removed before discharging into surface waters. High TDS levels have damaged industrial equipment, caused drinking water companies to issue drinking water advisories and even led to a massive fish kill on Dunkard Creek. Some of Pennsylvania’s rivers are near their capacity to absorb and dilute additional levels of TDS.

The proposed regulations will require drillers to treat drilling wastewater to 500 mg/l or to drinking water quality at the discharge pipe if they choose to return drilling wastewater to rivers and streams. Drillers have several options to dispose of wastewater in Pennsylvania, including: reuse or recycling; disposal in deep caverns when permitted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; or full treatment to the 500 mg/l for TDS standard.

The last option will only work if polluted water is properly treated to reduce high TDS levels. Several states, including Texas, Oklahoma, New York, Iowa, Virginia, Arkansas and Tennessee, prohibit returning any drilling wastewater to streams.

The panel also approved new regulations to enhance existing rules governing erosion, sediment control and stormwater to protect streams from the effects of new development, reduce localized flooding during heavy storms, and cut sediment and nutrient pollution. The new rules, which also include an updated permit fee structure, bring Pennsylvania into compliance with federal requirements for:

• Erosion and sedimentation controls and post-construction stormwater runoff;
• Creating mandatory requirements for establishing and protecting existing streamside and riverside buffers in high quality and exceptional value watersheds; and
• Enhancing agricultural stormwater management provisions beyond plowing and tilling to include animal-heavy use areas.

For more information, visit www.depweb.state.pa.us.

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