News

Beyond Nuclear Bulletin

September 10, 2009

 

Beyond Nuclear challenges new reactor & old waste at Fermi, Michigan

Beyond Nuclear has recently scored victories, and suffered defeats, in its intervention against the Fermi nuclear power plant on the Lake Erie shoreline. On July 31st, a Nuclear Regulatory Commission Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB) admitted four of the fourteen contentions Beyond Nuclear and its allies submitted opposing the Fermi 3 new reactor proposal. These included contentions on so-called "low level" radioactive waste, endangered species, groundwater contamination, and Lake Eriepollution concerns. On Aug. 21st, the same ASLB rejected Beyond Nuclear's call for security upgrades at Fermi 2's proposed dry cask storage facility for high-level radioactive waste. Beyond Nuclear will vigorously defend the four contentions at upcoming ASLB hearings, and appeal the exclusion of those rejected. Updates, intervention documents, and news articles are posted at our "Nuclear Reactors" Web site section.

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by MONICA VON DOBENECK, Of The Patriot-News

Thursday September 10, 2009

 

Steam billows out of the Reactor One cooling towers at the Three Mile Island nuclear power facility in Londonderry Twp.

The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant passed its last milestone on its way to a 20-year license renewal Thursday following a meeting with the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, an advisory group to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Neil Sheehan, spokesman for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, said it is likely a final decision will be made in November.

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Critic says generators should have been replaced years ago; spokesman for owner says plant was safe, relicensing sought.

Sunday News

 

Sep 06, 2009 

 

By JON RUTTER, Lancaster Sunday News Staff Writer

 

Three Mile Island is replacing its two steam generators two decades late, contends nuclear industry critic Eric Epstein.

Lots of people are waiting to glimpse the ponderous new machines.

The generators will be slowly piggybacked through the county this month on their way from Port Deposit, Md., to the atomic power plant at Middletown.

 

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NRC CHAIRMAN TASKS STAFF TO EVALUATE AGENCY ACTIVITIES ON BURIED PIPING AT NUCLEAR PLANTS 

NRC Chairman Gregory B. Jaczko has tasked the agency’s technical staff to review the NRC’s approach for overseeing buried pipes given recent incidents of leaking buried pipes at several U.S. commercial nuclear power plants.

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Radiation pills now available 

Middletown mayor questions why KI tablets are being distributed in Harrisburg instead of the borough

 

by Garry Lenton Press And Journal Staff : 9/2/2009

 

The state Department of Health is distributing potassium iodide, or KI, pills today and tomorrow to residents who live or work near a nuclear power station such as Three Mile Island.

 

 The pills protect the thyroid from radioactive iodine, which can be released during a nuclear accident.

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 To read the latest issue of Nuclear Monitor, open pdf:

 

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August 27, 2009 

By BEN LEACH Staff Writer 

 

An aluminum pipe that was leaking tritium at the Oyster Creek Generating Station in Lacey Township, New Jersey, has been removed and the leak has been stopped.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission confirmed Thursday that a 25-foot-long portion of pipe was removed and will be studied by a laboratory to see what could have caused the leak.

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August 28, 2009

No safety issues found to prevent reactors from running another 20 years.

 

By Rory Sweeney 

Times Leader Staff Writer

 The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission concluded that there are no safety issues that would stop PPL Corp. from relicensing its Susquehanna nuclear station for another 20 years, according to a report released by the agency on Thursday.

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By Kathryn Casa | Vermont Guardian

 

Posted March 24, 2005

 

The casks that Vermont Yankee plans to use to store highly radioactive nuclear waste in Vernon are “time bombs” riddled with material, design and welding flaws, according to a former nuclear industry inspector and auditor of the Holtec cask system.

 

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Aug. 26, 2009

By Julie Steenhuysen

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Younger Americans are being exposed to worrisome amounts of radiation from medical scans that increase their risk of cancer, U.S. researchers said on Wednesday.

They said the cumulative risk of repeated exposure to radiation from medical scans is a public health threat that needs to be addressed.

"Even though the individual risk for any patient exposed to these kinds of doses may be small, when you add that up over millions of people, that can be a concerning population risk," Dr. Reza Fazel of Emory University in Atlanta and colleagues wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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