It appears market forces are about to do what even the nation’s worst nuclear accident couldn’t: permanently close the Three Mile Island nuclear plant.

Exelon Corp, owner of the nuclear facility located some 10 miles south of Harrisburg, has announced plans to shutter the plant in 2019 absent state subsidies.

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The study marks the first time the partial meltdown of Unit 2's reactor can be connected to specific cancer cases, the researchers have said.

The findings may pose a dramatic challenge to the nuclear energy industry's position that the radiation released had no effect on human health.

The study was published Monday in the medical journal Laryngoscope, one day before Exelon Corp. (EXC) announced that Three Mile Island would close in 2019. It’s likely to come as another blow to a nuclear-power industry already struggling to stay profitable.

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The study marks the first time the partial meltdown of Unit 2's reactor can be connected to specific cancer cases, the researchers have said.

The findings may pose a dramatic challenge to the nuclear energy industry's position that the radiation released had no effect on human health.

The study was published Monday in the medical journal Laryngoscope, one day before Exelon Corp. (EXC) announced that Three Mile Island would close in 2019. It’s likely to come as another blow to a nuclear-power industry already struggling to stay profitable.

 

 

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Pennsylvania’s legislature still has time to help keep Exelon Corp.'s financially struggling Three Mile Island nuclear plant operating, Exelon’s Joseph Dominguez told Bloomberg BNA.

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Tuesday's announcement 

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PRESS STATEMENT

May 31, 2017

David A. Kraft, Director, NEIS

 

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for immediate release: 5/30/17

Three Mile Island Alert

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Most discussions of energy in Pennsylvania today start with natural gas.  For much of the past decade, drilling in the Marcellus Shale regions of the state has made Pennsylvania one of the nation's leading energy producers.  During his campaign for president, Donald Trump promised to bring coal back and many are still clamoring for expansion and more use of renewable energy in the state.

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Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Press Release

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